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Articles written by Lauran Neergaard

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Coronavirus survivor: 'In my blood, there may be answers'

NEW YORK (AP) — Tiffany Pinckney remembers the fear when COVID-19 stole her breath. So when she recovered, the New York City mother became one of the country's first survivors to donate her blood to help treat other seriously ill patients. "It is...

 

Straight-talking Fauci explains outbreak to a worried nation

WASHINGTON (AP) — If Dr. Anthony Fauci says it, you'd be smart to listen. As the coronavirus has upended daily life across the globe, Fauci has become the trusted voice in separating fact and fiction. The fear and confusion of outbreaks aren't new...

 

Trump says US 'very ready' for virus; Pence to lead response

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump declared Wednesday that the U.S. is "very, very ready" for whatever the coronavirus threat brings, and he put his vice president in charge of overseeing the nation's response. Trump sought to minimize fears...

 

Some hospitals wary as new liver transplant rules begin

WASHINGTON (AP) — Long-delayed rules that will more broadly share scarce donated livers go into effect Tuesday, to the dismay of some hospitals in Tennessee, Kansas and other states that fear their patients may lose out. Where you live makes a...

 

Too soon to tell if new virus as dangerous as SARS cousin

The new virus from China has the world on edge because it's a close cousin to viruses that killed hundreds in separate outbreaks. While it's too early to tell if this latest threat will prove as deadly, health authorities are drawing on lessons from...

 

1st malaria vaccine tried out in babies in 3 African nations

TOMALI, Malawi (AP) — A pinch in the leg, a squeal and a trickle of tears. One baby after another in Malawi is getting the first and only vaccine against malaria, one of history's deadliest and most stubborn of diseases. The southern African...

 

Bacteria-infected mosquitoes take bite out of deadly dengue

WASHINGTON (AP) — They still bite, but new research shows lab-grown mosquitoes are fighting dangerous dengue fever that they normally would spread. Dengue infections appear to be dropping fast in communities in Indonesia, Vietnam, Brazil and...

 

Cholesterol levels dropping in US, but many still need care

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some good health news: Americans' cholesterol levels are dropping, and more people at especially high risk are getting treatment. Researchers say Monday's report suggests a controversial change in recommendations for cholesterol...

 

Measles saps kids' ability to fight other germs

WASHINGTON (AP) — Measles has a stealth side effect: New research shows it erases much of the immune system's memory of how to fight other germs, so children recover only to be left more vulnerable to bugs like flu or strep. Scientists dubbed the s...

 

Sanders has heart procedure, cancels campaign events for now

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bernie Sanders' campaign said Wednesday that the Democratic presidential candidate had a heart procedure for a blocked artery and was canceling events and appearances "until further notice." The 78-year-old Vermont senator...

 

Trump halts fetal tissue research by government scientists

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration said Wednesday that it is ending medical research by government scientists that uses human fetal tissue,. The Health and Human Services Department said in a statement that government-funded research by uni...

 

Tracking microbes people carry may predict future health

WASHINGTON (AP) — We share our bodies with trillions of microbes that are critical to staying healthy, but now scientists are getting a much-needed close look at how those bugs can get out of whack and spur disease. One lesson: A single test to...

 

It seems like Alzheimer's but peek into brain shows a mimic

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some people told they have Alzheimer's may instead have a newly identified mimic of the disease — and scientists say even though neither is yet curable, it's critical to get better at telling different kinds of dementia apart....

 

Study: Safe to transplant hepatitis C-infected hearts, lungs

WASHINGTON (AP) — Doctors can safely transplant hepatitis C-infected lungs and hearts into people desperate for a new organ, say researchers who may have found a way to protect those patients from getting the risky virus. The experiment, reported...

 

Apple Watch may spot heart problem but more research needed

WASHINGTON (AP) — A huge study suggests the Apple Watch can detect a worrisome irregular heartbeat at least sometimes — but experts say more work is needed to tell if using wearable technology to screen for heart problems really helps. More than...

 

Gluten, lactose in drugs? Study raises questions about risk

WASHINGTON (AP) — A man with celiac disease felt sicker after starting a new drug, but it wasn't a typical side effect. It turns out the pills were mixed with gluten the patient knew to avoid in food — but was surprised to find hiding in...

 

How 'completely avoidable' measles cases continue to climb

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. has counted more measles cases in the first two months of this year than in all of 2017 — and part of the rising threat is misinformation that makes some parents balk at a crucial vaccine, federal health officials told...

 

Using 1 germ to fight another when today's antibiotics fail

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) — Bacteria lodged deep in Ella Balasa's lungs were impervious to most antibiotics. At 26, gasping for breath, she sought out a dramatic experiment — deliberately inhaling a virus culled from sewage to attack her superbug....

 

Researchers find clues that depression may speed brain aging

WASHINGTON (AP) — Memory and thinking skills naturally slow with age but now scientists are peeking inside living brains to tell if depression might worsen that decline — and finding some worrisome clues. Depression has long been linked to certai...

 

Year in space put US astronaut's disease defenses on alert

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly a year in space put astronaut Scott Kelly's immune system on high alert and changed the activity of some of his genes compared to his Earth-bound identical twin, researchers said Friday. Scientists don't know if the changes...

 

No stethoscope for pain: Scientists seek real way to measure

WASHINGTON (AP) — Is the pain stabbing or burning? On a scale from 1 to 10, is it a 6 or an 8? Over and over, 17-year-old Sarah Taylor struggled to make doctors understand her sometimes debilitating levels of pain, first from joint-damaging...

 

Experimental app might spot drug overdoses in time to help

WASHINGTON (AP) — Too often people die of an opioid overdose because no one's around to notice they're in trouble. Now scientists are creating a smartphone app that beams sound waves to measure breathing — and summon help if it stops. The app is...

 

AP-NORC Poll: Most support gene editing to protect babies

WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans say it would be OK to use gene-editing technology to create babies protected against a variety of diseases — but a new poll shows they'd draw the line at changing DNA so children are born smarter, faster or taller...

 

Cuba health mystery: Diplomats had inner-ear damage early on

MIAMI (AP) — American diplomats affected by mysterious health incidents in Cuba showed damage in the inner ear shortly after they complained of weird noises and sensations, according to their earliest medical exams, publicized Wednesday. The...

 

Next generation of biotech food heading for grocery stores

WASHINGTON (AP) — The next generation of biotech food is headed for the grocery aisles, and first up may be salad dressings or granola bars made with soybean oil genetically tweaked to be good for your heart. By early next year, the first foods fro...

 

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