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NIH ends alcohol study, citing funding, credibility problems

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government is shutting down a study that was supposed to show if a single drink a day could prevent heart attacks, saying ethical problems with how the research was planned and funded undermine its credibility. The...

 

Sexual harassment rampant in science, culture change urged

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sexual harassment is rampant in academic science, and colleges and universities that train new scientists need a system-wide culture change so women won't be bullied out of the field, a national advisory group said Tuesday. In...

 

New evidence that viruses may play a role in Alzheimer's

WASHINGTON (AP) — Viruses that sneak into the brain just might play a role in Alzheimer's, scientists reported Thursday in a provocative study that promises to re-ignite some long-debated theories about what triggers the mind-robbing disease. The...

 

US seeking 1 million for massive study of DNA, health habits

WASHINGTON (AP) — Wanted: A million people willing to share their DNA and 10 years of health habits, big and small, for science. On Sunday, the U.S. government will open nationwide enrollment for an ambitious experiment: If they can build a large...

 

Study finds obesity robs the tongue of taste buds in mice

WASHINGTON (AP) — Packing on pounds seems to dull people's sense of taste, and puzzled researchers turned to mice to figure out why: Obesity, they found, can rob the tongue of taste buds. If Tuesday's findings pan out, "this could be a whole new...

 

Report: Abortion is safe but barriers reduce quality of care

WASHINGTON (AP) — Abortions in the U.S. are very safe but getting one without facing delays and false medical information depends on where women live, says a broad examination of the nation's abortion services. Friday's report from the National...

 

Superagers' youthful brains offer clues to keeping sharp

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's pretty extraordinary for people in their 80s and 90s to keep the same sharp memory as someone several decades younger, and now scientists are peeking into the brains of these "superagers" to uncover their secret. The work is...

 

Scientists aim at joint injuries that can trigger arthritis

WASHINGTON (AP) — Arthritis isn't always from the wear and tear of getting older — younger adults too often get it after suffering knee or ankle injuries. Now researchers are hunting a way to stave off the damage, by targeting the little energy...

 

Cancer from cellphones? New studies say no need to hang up

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two government studies that bombarded rats and mice with cellphone radiation found a weak link to some heart tumors, but federal regulators and some scientists say don't worry — it is safe to use your device. They still do....

 

Tiny implant opens way to deliver drugs deep into the brain

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have created a hair-thin implant that can drip medications deep into the brain by remote control and with pinpoint precision. Tested only in animals so far, if the device pans out it could mark a new approach to...

 

Gov't scientists scramble to save research ahead of shutdown

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation's premier medical research institute is in "a scramble" to prepare for a partial government shutdown that could ruin costly experiments and leave sick patients unable to enter cutting-edge studies, Dr. Anthony Fauci of...

 

Scientists seek super-shot for flu 100 years after pandemic

WASHINGTON (AP) — The descriptions are haunting. Some victims felt fine in the morning and were dead by night. Faces turned blue as patients coughed up blood. Stacked bodies outnumbered coffins. A century after one of history's most catastrophic...

 

Striking a chord, NIH taps the brain to find how music heals

WASHINGTON (AP) — Like a friendly Pied Piper, the violinist keeps up a toe-tapping beat as dancers weave through busy hospital hallways and into the chemotherapy unit, patients looking up in surprised delight. Upstairs, a cellist plays an Irish...

 

Are 3-D mammograms really better? US puts scans to the test

WASHINGTON (AP) — A better mammogram? Increasingly women are asked if they want a 3-D mammogram instead of the regular X-ray — and now U.S. health officials are starting a huge study to tell if the newer, sometimes pricier choice really improves...

 

Expanding DNA's alphabet lets cells produce novel proteins

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists are expanding the genetic code of life, using man-made DNA to create a semi-synthetic strain of bacteria — and new research shows those altered microbes actually worked to produce proteins unlike those found in...

 

Baby gene therapy study offers hope for fatal muscle disease

WASHINGTON (AP) — A first attempt at gene therapy for a disease that leaves babies unable to move, swallow and, eventually, breathe has extended the tots' lives, and some began to roll over, sit and stand on their own, researchers reported...

 

Scientists working toward reversible kind of gene editing

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists are altering a powerful gene-editing technology in hopes of one day fighting diseases without making permanent changes to people's DNA. The trick: Edit RNA instead, the messenger that carries a gene's instructions. "If...

 

Millions die suffering amid global opioid gap, report says

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly 26 million people around the world die each year with serious suffering in part because of a huge gap in pain relief: The U.S. may be awash in opioid painkillers, but they're rare or unavailable in dozens of poor...

 

Trying to get sober? NIH offers tool to help find good care

WASHINGTON (AP) — The phone calls come — from fellow scientists and desperate strangers — with a single question for the alcohol chief at the National Institutes of Health: Where can my loved one find good care to get sober? Tuesday, the...

 

Get your flu shots, US urges amid concerns about bad season

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's flu shot time, and health officials are bracing for a potentially miserable fall and winter. The clues: The Southern Hemisphere, especially Australia, was hit hard over the past few months with a flu strain that's notorious...

 

Mosquito gut bacteria may offer clues to malaria control

WASHINGTON (AP) — Mosquitoes harbor gut bacteria just like people do — and the bugs inside the bugs may hold a key to fighting malaria. Today, bed nets and insecticides are the chief means of preventing malaria, which sickens about 200 million...

 

Cuba mystery: What theories US investigators are pursuing

WASHINGTON (AP) — There must be an answer. Whatever is harming U.S. diplomats in Havana, it's eluded the doctors, scientists and intelligence analysts scouring for answers. Investigators have chased many theories, including a sonic attack,...

 

AP NewsBreak: Medicare card remake to protect seniors

WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare cards are getting a makeover to fight identity theft. No more Social Security numbers plastered on the card. Next April, Medicare will begin mailing every beneficiary a new card with a unique new number to identify them....

 

Age matters when it comes to screening for cervical cancer

WASHINGTON (AP) — Getting checked for cervical cancer isn't one-size-fits-all: Millions of women may soon have to decide between a routine Pap or a newer test that detects if they have a cancer-causing virus. Draft national guidelines released...

 

Testing probe to help cancer surgeons know they got it all

WASHINGTON (AP) — Patients emerging from cancer surgery want to know, "Did you get it all?" Now scientists are developing a pen-like probe to help surgeons better tell when it's safe to stop cutting or if stray tumor cells still lurk. The device is...

 

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