Alva Review-Courier -

Articles written by Lindsey Tanner

Sorted by date  Results 1 - 25 of 70



New genetic links to same-sex sexuality found in huge study

CHICAGO (AP) — The largest study of its kind found new evidence that genes contribute to same-sex sexual behavior, but it echoes research that says there are no specific genes that make people gay. The genome-wide research on DNA from nearly half...

 

Is pot safe when pregnant? Study seeks answer, draws critics

CHICAGO (AP) — Pregnancy started out rough for Leslie Siu. Morning sickness and migraines had her reeling and barely able to function at a demanding New York marketing job, so like rising numbers of U.S. mothers-to-be, she turned to marijuana. "l w...

 

Dementia tied to hormone-blocking prostate cancer treatment

CHICAGO (AP) — Alzheimer's disease may be a risk for older prostate cancer patients given hormone-blocking treatment, a large, U.S. government-funded analysis found. Previous evidence has been mixed on whether the treatment might be linked with...

 

Deaths from falls among older Americans are on the rise

CHICAGO (AP) — New research shows fatal falls have nearly tripled in older Americans in recent years, rising to more than 25,000 deaths yearly. The findings highlight the importance of fall prevention. A separate study bolsters evidence that...

 

Mass shootings create rippling network of stricken survivors

CHICAGO (AP) — Pardeep Singh Kaleka has surveyed the landscape of an America scarred by mass shootings. Seven years ago, a white supremacist invaded a Sikh temple in Wisconsin and killed six worshippers — among them Kaleka's father, who died...

 

Mass shootings transform how America talks, prays, prepares

CHICAGO (AP) — Pardeep Singh Kaleka has surveyed the landscape of an America scarred by mass shootings. Seven years ago, a white supremacist invaded a Sikh temple in Wisconsin and killed six worshippers — among them Kaleka's father, who died...

 

Cholesterol improves in US kids despite high obesity rates

CHICAGO (AP) — Cholesterol levels in children and teens improved in the latest analysis of U.S. health surveys, yet only half of them had readings considered ideal. Overall, 7% of kids had high cholesterol in surveys from 2009 to 2016. That was...

 

US medical marketing reaches $30 billion, drug ads top surge

Ads for prescription drugs appeared 5 million times in just one year, capping a recent surge in U.S. medical marketing, a new analysis found. The advertisements for various medicines showed up on TV, newspapers, online sites and elsewhere in 2016. Th...

 

Detecting depression: Phone apps could monitor teen angst

Rising suicide rates and depression in U.S. teens and young adults have prompted researchers to ask a provocative question: Could the same devices that some people blame for contributing to tech-age angst also be used to detect it? The idea has spark...

 

Trippy depression treatment? Hopes and hype for ketamine

CHICAGO (AP) — It was launched decades ago as an anesthetic for animals and people, became a potent battlefield pain reliever in Vietnam and morphed into the trippy club drug Special K. Now the chameleon drug ketamine is finding new life as an...

 

Halloween can be deadly for pedestrians, traffic study says

Trick-or-treaters beware: Halloween can be deadly for pedestrians and children face the greatest danger. Research published Tuesday found a 43 percent higher risk of pedestrian deaths on Halloween night than on other nights near that date. The study...

 

Science Says: Fatal outbreak germ a threat to frail patients

A common virus blamed for a deadly outbreak at a New Jersey children's rehabilitation center usually poses little risk for healthy people but can lead to dangerous pneumonia in already frail patients. The patients, most younger than 18, were...

 

Desperate & duped? GoFundMe means big bucks for dubious care

People seeking dubious, potentially harmful treatment for cancer and other ailments raised nearly $7 million over two years from crowdfunding sites, a study found. Echoing recent research on campaigns for stem cell therapies, the findings raise more...

 

Antibiotics for appendicitis? Surgery often not needed

CHICAGO (AP) — When emergency tests showed the telltale right-sided pain in Heather VanDusen's abdomen was appendicitis, she figured she'd be quickly wheeled into surgery. But doctors offered her the option of antibiotics instead. A new study from...

 

Active shooter study: Semi-automatic rifles more deadly

CHICAGO (AP) — Active shooters with semi-automatic rifles wound and kill twice as many people as those using weapons that don't self-load, although chances of dying if hit in either type of assault are the same, a new analysis shows. Researchers...

 

New advice on kids' concussions calls for better tracking

CHICAGO (AP) — New children's concussion guidelines from the U.S. government recommend against routine X-rays and blood tests for diagnosis and reassure parents that most kids' symptoms clear up within one to three months. Signs of potentially...

 

Mom's use of opioids in pregnancy may stunt kids' learning

CHICAGO (AP) — Learning disabilities and other special education needs are common in children born with opioid-related symptoms from their mother's drug use while pregnant, according to the first big U.S. study to examine potential long-term...

 

Worldwide gun deaths reach 250,000 yearly; US ranks high

CHICAGO (AP) — Gun deaths worldwide total about 250,000 yearly and the United States is among just six countries that make up half of those fatalities, a study found. The results from one of the most comprehensive analyses of firearm deaths reveal...

 

Advocates condemn psych techniques used to keep kids online

CHICAGO (AP) — Children's advocates want the American Psychological Association to condemn the tech industry's practice of using persuasive psychological techniques to keep kids glued to their screens. The advocates, citing research that links...

 

Frustrated AMA adopts sweeping policies to cut gun violence

CHICAGO (AP) — With frustration mounting over lawmakers' inaction on gun control, the American Medical Association on Tuesday pressed for a ban on assault weapons and came out against arming teachers as a way to fight what it calls a public health...

 

Science Says: What makes something truly addictive

CHICAGO (AP) — Now that the world's leading public health group says too much Minecraft can be an addiction, could overindulging in chocolate, exercise, even sex, be next? The short answer is probably not. The new "gaming disorder" classification...

 

Celebrity suicides highlight troubling trend in midlife

CHICAGO (AP) — The deaths of celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain and fashion designer Kate Spade highlight a troubling trend — rising suicides among middle-aged Americans. Mental health problems, often undiagnosed, are usually involved and experts...

 

Blacks fare surprisingly well in prostate cancer research

CHICAGO (AP) — Black men with advanced prostate cancer fared surprisingly well in two new studies that challenge current thinking about racial disparities in the disease. Blacks are more likely to get prostate cancer and to die from it than...

 

More US adults try vaping but current use is down, data show

CHICAGO (AP) — New research shows 1 in 7 U.S. adults have tried electronic cigarettes. That's an increase but it's offset by a small decline in the number currently using the devices. About 3 percent of adults were current users in 2016, down from...

 

US panel leaves prostate screening up to men, their doctors

CHICAGO (AP) — Whether to get screened for prostate cancer is a question that men aged 55 to 69 should decide themselves in consultation with their doctors, according to finalized guidance issued Tuesday by an influential panel of health care...

 

Page Down

Our Family of Publications Includes:

Powered by ROAR Online Publication Software from Lions Light Corporation
© Copyright 2019