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Articles written by Marilynn Marchione

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A gene-editing first: scientists tried CRISPR to fight HIV

Scientists are reporting the first use of the gene-editing tool CRISPR to try to cure a patient's HIV infection by providing blood cells that were altered to resist the AIDS virus. The gene-editing tool has long been used in research labs, and a Chin...

 

New clues on why women's Alzheimer's risk differs from men's

LOS ANGELES (AP) — New research gives some biological clues to why women may be more likely than men to develop Alzheimer's disease and how this most common form of dementia varies by sex. At the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in... Full story

 

A healthy lifestyle may offset genetic risk for Alzheimer's

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of developing Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia even if you have genes that raise your risk for these mind-destroying diseases, a large study has found. People with high genetic risk and...

 

Scientists close in on blood test for Alzheimer's

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Scientists are closing in on a long-sought goal — a blood test to screen people for possible signs of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. On Monday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference, half a...

 

New gene tests for germs quickly reveal source of infections

Brian Jetter was on life support, a healthy 40-year-old suddenly battling pneumonia and sepsis, and a slew of tests had failed to find the cause. Mystery illnesses like this kill thousands of people each year when germs can't be identified fast...

 

Companies report progress on blood tests to detect cancer

A California company says its experimental blood test was able to detect many types of cancer at an early stage and gave very few false alarms in a study that included people with and without the disease. Grail Inc. gave results in a news release on...

 

6 months later, gene-edited babies stir new interest, debate

Six months after a Chinese scientist was widely scorned for helping to make the world's first gene-edited babies, he remains out of public view, and new information suggests that others may be interested in pursuing the same kind of work outside the...

 

US pregnancy deaths are up, especially among minorities

Pregnancy-related deaths are rising in the United States and the main risk factor is being black, according to new reports that highlight racial disparities in care during and after childbirth. Black women, along with Native Americans and Alaska...

 

Brain scans may reveal concussion damage in living athletes

Researchers may be closing in on a way to check athletes while they're alive for signs of a degenerative brain disease that's been linked to frequent head blows. Experimental scans found higher levels of an abnormal protein tied to the disease in a...

 

Nearly half of US adults have heart or blood vessel disease

A new report estimates that nearly half of all U.S. adults have some form of heart or blood vessel disease, a medical milestone that's mostly due to recent guidelines that expanded how many people have high blood pressure. The American Heart Associat...

 

China halts work by team on gene-edited babies

HONG KONG (AP) — China's government ordered a halt Thursday to work by a medical team that claimed to have helped make the world's first gene-edited babies, as a group of leading scientists declared that it's still too soon to try to make permanent...

 

Scientists: World still isn't ready for gene-edited babies

HONG KONG (AP) — A group of leading scientists has declared that it's still too soon to try making permanent changes to DNA that can be inherited by future generations, as a Chinese researcher claims to have done. The scientists gathered in Hong...

 

US doctor warns against backlash to gene-edited baby claim

HONG KONG (AP) — A prominent American scientist is warning against a backlash to the claim that a Chinese scientist has helped make the world's first gene-edited babies. Harvard Medical School dean Dr. George Daley says it would be unfortunate if...

 

Big studies give mixed news on fish oil, vitamin D

CHICAGO (AP) — Taking fish oil or vitamin D? Big studies give long-awaited answers on who does and does not benefit from these popular nutrients. Fish oil taken by healthy people, at a dose found in many supplements, showed no clear ability to...

 

Immunotherapy scores a first win against some breast cancers

For the first time, one of the new immunotherapy drugs has shown promise against breast cancer in a large study that combined it with chemotherapy to treat an aggressive form of the disease. But the benefit for most women was small, raising...

 

FDA plans meeting to discuss safety data on breast implants

U.S. health regulators say they'll convene a public meeting of medical advisers next year to discuss new science on breast implant safety, including an independent analysis that suggests certain rare health problems might be more common with...

 

Early results boost hopes for historic gene editing attempt

PHOENIX (AP) — Early, partial results from a historic gene editing study give encouraging signs that the treatment may be safe and having at least some of its hoped-for effect, but it's too soon to know whether it ultimately will succeed. The...

 

Officials remove special rules for gene therapy experiments

U.S. health officials are eliminating special regulations for gene therapy experiments, saying that what was once exotic science is quickly becoming an established form of medical care with no extraordinary risks. A special National Institutes of...

 

Helping nature: Inducing labor avoids cesarean for some moms

Move over, Mother Nature. First-time moms at low risk of complications were less likely to need a cesarean delivery if labor was induced at 39 weeks instead of waiting for it to start on its own, a big study found. Their babies fared better, too....

 

Hopes rise again for a drug to slow Alzheimer's disease

CHICAGO (AP) — Hopes are rising again for a drug to alter the course of Alzheimer's disease after decades of failures. An experimental therapy slowed mental decline by 30 percent in patients who got the highest dose in a mid-stage study, and it...

 

Study: Lowering blood pressure helps prevent mental decline

CHICAGO (AP) — Lowering blood pressure more than usually recommended not only helps prevent heart problems, it also cuts the risk of mental decline that often leads to Alzheimer's disease, a major study finds. It's the first time a single step has...

 

Late-life high blood pressure may harm the brain, study says

Decades ago, hundreds of nuns and priests made an extraordinary decision: They agreed to donate their brains upon death to science, hoping to help solve mysteries about Alzheimer's and other diseases. Now, a study that used their gifts is giving...

 

Enemy turned ally: Poliovirus is used to fight brain tumors

One of the world's most dreaded viruses has been turned into a treatment to fight deadly brain tumors. Survival was better than expected for patients in a small study who were given genetically modified poliovirus, which helped their bodies attack...

 

E-cigarettes disappoint in a workplace quit-smoking study

It's a big question for smokers and policymakers alike: Do electronic cigarettes help people quit? In a large study of company wellness programs, e-cigarettes worked no better than traditional stop-smoking tools, and the only thing that really...

 

Shorter drug treatment OK for many breast cancer patients

Many women with a common and aggressive form of breast cancer that is treated with Herceptin can get by with six months of the drug instead of the usual 12, greatly reducing the risk of heart damage it sometimes can cause, a study suggests. It's...

 

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