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Articles written by Seth Borenstein

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Weather agency chief: I've never briefed Trump on warming

WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the government agency that monitors climate change says that in nearly two years he has never discussed the issue with President Donald Trump. Acting National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration chief Adm. Timothy...

 

Scary warming at poles showing up at weird times, places

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists are seeing surprising melting in Earth's polar regions at times they don't expect, like winter, and in places they don't expect, like eastern Antarctica. New studies and reports issued this week at a major Earth...

 

Climate reality check: Global carbon pollution up in 2018

WASHINGTON (AP) — After several years of little growth, global emissions of heat-trapping carbon dioxide experienced their largest jump in seven years, discouraging scientists. World carbon dioxide emissions are estimated to have risen 2.7 percent...

 

Whale songs and war: The less talked-about climate impacts

WASHINGTON (AP) — Near Antarctica, whales are singing in deeper tones to cut through the noise of melting icebergs. In California, a big college football rivalry game was postponed until Saturday because of smoky air from wildfires. And Alaskan...

 

AP FACT CHECK: 11 Trump climate goofs and 1 correct claim

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's elemental. President Donald Trump got his facts about earth, water, air and fire wrong as he and his aides spent a week attacking the White House climate report. In interviews and off-the-cuff remarks, public statements and...

 

Government climate report warns of worsening US disasters

WASHINGTON (AP) — As California's catastrophic wildfires recede and people rebuild after two hurricanes, a massive new federal report warns that these types of extreme weather disasters are worsening in the United States. The White House report...

 

Government ranks 18 US volcanoes as 'very high threat'

WASHINGTON (AP) — Government scientists have classified 18 U.S. volcanoes as "very high threat" because of what's been happening inside them and how close they are to people. The U.S. Geological Survey has updated its volcano threat assessments...

 

Report: Efforts to suck carbon from air must be ramped up

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation needs to ramp up efforts to suck heat-trapping gases out of the air to fight climate change, a new U.S. report said. The report Wednesday from the National Academy of Sciences says technology to do so has gotten...

 

Wet and mild: Warm winter predicted for much of the US

WASHINGTON (AP) — Winter looks wet and especially mild for much of the country, thanks to a weak El Nino brewing, U.S. meteorologists said. The National Weather Service on Thursday predicted a warmer than normal winter for the northern and western...

 

Tornadoes are spinning up farther east in US, study finds

WASHINGTON (AP) — Over the past few decades tornadoes have been shifting — decreasing in Oklahoma, Texas and Kansas but spinning up more in states along the Mississippi River and farther east, a new study shows. Scientists aren't quite certain wh...

 

AP FACT CHECK: Trump on hurricane and political winds

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hurricane Michael has shown that President Donald Trump can't always be counted on to give accurate information to the public when a natural disaster unfolds. Trump wrongly stated that the hurricane moved across land with blazing...

 

Trump may not know what's behind warming, but scientists do

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite what President Donald Trump says, scientists have long known that what's warming the planet isn't natural. It's us. They even have the energy balance sheets accounting for changes in the climate to prove it. President...

 

Global warming to leave us crying in our costlier beer

WASHINGTON (AP) — Add beer to chocolate , coffee and wine as some of life's little pleasures that global warming will make scarcer and costlier, scientists say. Increasing bouts of extreme heat waves and drought will hurt production of barley, a...

 

Fast, furious: How Michael grew into a 155 mph monster

WASHINGTON (AP) — Moist air, warm waters in the Gulf of Mexico, and ideal wind patterns supercharged Hurricane Michael in the hours before it smacked Florida's Panhandle. Hurricane Michael was barely a hurricane Tuesday morning, with winds of 90...

 

UN report on global warming carries life-or-death warning

WASHINGTON (AP) — Preventing an extra single degree of heat could make a life-or-death difference in the next few decades for multitudes of people and ecosystems on this fast-warming planet, an international panel of scientists reported Sunday....

 

No free lunch for renewables: More wind power would warm US

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ramping up wind power in America would also dial up the nation's temperatures, a new study out of Harvard found. While wind energy is widely celebrated as environmentally friendly, the researchers concluded that a dramatic,...

 

Florence is nation's second wettest storm, behind Harvey

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hurricane Florence was the nation's second rainiest storm in 70 years, a top rainfall meteorologist calculated. Only last year's Hurricane Harvey rained more over a 14,000 square mile (36,260 square kilometers) area during a...

 

2 storms, Florence and Mangkhut, different as water and wind

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nature expresses its fury in sundry ways. Two deadly storms — Hurricane Florence and Typhoon Mangkhut — roared ashore on the same day, half a world apart, but the way they spread devastation was as different as water and...

 

AP Explains: How storm surges build up, destroy and kill

WASHINGTON (AP) — Behold the awesome power of water. Already the ocean is swallowing beaches, roads and anything else in the way of Hurricane Florence's monstrous storm surge. Storm surges aren't walls of water, like a tsunami, as commonly...

 

A warmer world makes hurricanes wetter and more intense

WASHINGTON (AP) — A warmer world makes for nastier hurricanes. Scientists say they are wetter, possess more energy and intensify faster. Their storm surges are more destructive because climate change has already made the seas rise. And lately, the...

 

Florence and the coastal dilemma: How long will it hover?

WASHINGTON (AP) — Oddly, the closer Hurricane Florence gets to land the murkier its future gets. Usually when a storm approaches the coast, forecasters can tell with ever increasing accuracy where it will hit and who will get walloped. But not...

 

Hurricane Florence has ingredients that make experts worry

WASHINGTON (AP) — To whip up a monstrous storm like the one chugging for the Carolinas you need a handful of ingredients — and Florence has them all. Warmer than normal sea temperatures to add energy and rain to a storm. Check. A wind pattern...

 

Word detectives: Science may help finger opinion columnist

WASHINGTON (AP) — Language detectives say the key clues to who wrote the anonymous New York Times opinion piece slamming President Donald Trump may not be the odd and glimmering "lodestar," but the itty-bitty words that people usually read right...

 

Global warming could spur more and hungrier crop-eating bugs

WASHINGTON (AP) — A warmer world likely means more and hungrier insects chomping on crops and less food on dinner plates, a new study suggests. Insects now consume about 10 percent of the globe's food, but that will increase to 15 to 20 percent by...

 

Bat signal: Fireflies' glow tells bats they taste awful

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fireflies flash not just for sex, but survival, a new study suggests. Scientists wanted to find out if there's more to the lightning bug's signature blinking glow than finding a mate. Some experts had speculated it was a glaring...

 

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