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Articles written by Seth Borenstein

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2022 was fifth or sixth warmest on record as Earth heats up

DENVER (AP) — Earth's fever persisted last year, not quite spiking to a record high but still in the top five or six warmest on record, government agencies reported Thursday. But expect record-shattering hot years soon, likely in the next couple...

 

Study: Two-thirds of glaciers on track to disappear by 2100

The world's glaciers are shrinking and disappearing faster than scientists thought, with two-thirds of them projected to melt out of existence by the end of the century at current climate change trends, according to a new study. But if the world can...

 

Handshake sparks climate hope, but officials remain worried

SHARM EL-SHEIKH (AP) — A handshake in lush Bali is being felt at climate talks thousands of miles away in the Egyptian desert, where lack of progress had a top United Nations official worried. After more than a week of so far fruitless climate...

 

Big climate bill: Major new spending to spur green energy

WASHINGTON (AP) — After decades of inaction in the face of escalating natural disasters and sustained global warming, Congress hopes to make clean energy so cheap in all aspects of life that it's nearly irresistible. The House is poised to pass a...

 

Study connects climate hazards to 58% of infectious diseases

Climate hazards such as flooding, heat waves and drought have worsened more than half of the hundreds of known infectious diseases in people, including malaria, hantavirus, cholera and anthrax, a study says. Researchers looked through the medical...

 

Baby stars, dancing galaxies: NASA shows new cosmic views

GREENBELT, Md. (AP) — A sparkling landscape of baby stars. A foamy blue and orange view of a dying star. Five galaxies in a cosmic dance. The splendors of the universe glowed in a new batch of images released Tuesday from NASA's powerful new...

 

Experts: Everything points to another busy hurricane season

Batten down the hatches for another nasty hurricane season. Nearly every natural force and a bunch of human-caused ones — more than just climate change — have turned the last several Atlantic hurricane seasons into deadly and expensive whoppers....

 

Global pollution kills 9 million people a year, study finds

A new study blames pollution of all types for 9 million deaths a year globally, with the death toll attributed to dirty air from cars, trucks and industry rising 55% since 2000. That increase is offset by fewer pollution deaths from primitive indoor...

 

Weary of many disasters? UN says worse to come

A disaster-weary globe will be hit harder in the coming years by even more catastrophes colliding in an interconnected world, a United Nations report issued Monday says. If current trends continue the world will go from around 400 disasters per year...

 

UN: 18 nations have gone green on climate, raked in green

Proponents of clean energy and thinks tanks have long said it's possible to reduce emissions and keep an economy growing. Now the latest report from the world's top climate scientists says 18 countries have done just that, sustaining emissions...

 

Ice shelf collapses in previously stable East Antarctica

An ice shelf the size of New York City has collapsed in East Antarctica, an area long thought to be stable and not hit much by climate change, concerned scientists said Friday. The collapse, captured by satellite images, marked the first time in huma...

 

EXPLAINER: Why the South gets more killer tornadoes at night

Forget "The Wizard of Oz." Tornadoes are causing far more deaths and destruction east and south of Kansas these days. And they're often doing it in the dark of night. Tuesday night's deadly tornado that struck the New Orleans area is the ideal...

 

Scientists explore Thwaites, Antarctica's 'doomsday' glacier

A team of scientists are sailing to "the place in the world that's the hardest to get to" so they can better figure out how much and how fast seas will rise because of global warming eating away at Antarctica's ice. Thirty-two scientists on Thursday...

 

Study: Winter tornadoes to get more powerful as world warms

Nasty winter tornadoes — like the deadly ones last week that hit five states — are likely to be stronger and stay on the ground longer with a wider swath of destruction in a warming world, a new study shows. The combination of a longer and wider...

 

Nations compromise on coal to strike UN climate agreement

GLASGOW, Scotland (AP) — Almost 200 nations accepted a compromise deal Saturday aimed at keeping a key global warming target alive, but it contained a last-minute change that watered down crucial language about coal. Several countries, including...

 

China, US pledge to increase cooperation at UN climate talks

GLASGOW, Scotland (AP) — The world's top carbon polluters, China and the United States, agreed Wednesday to increase their cooperation and speed up action to rein in climate-damaging emissions, signaling a mutual effort on global warming at a time...

 

Globe bounces back to nearly 2019 carbon pollution levels

GLASGOW, Scotland (AP) — The dramatic drop in carbon dioxide emissions from the pandemic lockdown has pretty much disappeared in a puff of coal-fired smoke, much of it from China, a new scientific study found. A group of scientists who track...

 

Reports: Health problems tied to global warming on the rise

Health problems tied to climate change are all getting worse, according to two reports published Wednesday. The annual reports commissioned by the medical journal Lancet tracked 44 global health indicators connected to climate change, including heat...

 

Physics Nobel rewards work on climate change, other forces

STOCKHOLM (AP) — Three scientists won the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for work that found order in seeming disorder, helping to explain and predict complex forces of nature, including expanding our understanding of climate change. Syukuro Manabe...

 

Study: Warmer Arctic led to killer cold in Texas, much of US

Warming of the Arctic caused by climate change has increased the number of polar vortex outbreaks, when frigid air from the far north bathes the central and eastern United States in killer cold, a study finds. The study in the journal Science...

 

Global sizzling: July was hottest month on record, NOAA says

Earth sizzled in July and became the hottest month in 142 years of recordkeeping, U.S. weather officials announced. As extreme heat waves struck parts of the United States and Europe, the globe averaged 62.07 degrees (16.73 degrees Celsius) last...

 

Want to pretend to live on Mars? For a whole year? Apply now

Want to find your inner Matt Damon and spend a year pretending you are isolated on Mars? NASA has a job for you. To prepare for eventually sending astronauts to Mars, NASA began taking applications Friday for four people to live for a year in Mars...

 

'Code red': UN scientists warn of worsening global warming

Earth is getting so hot that temperatures in about a decade will probably blow past a level of warming that world leaders have sought to prevent, according to a report released Monday that the United Nations called a "code red for humanity." "It's...

 

New theory: Earth's longer days kick-started oxygen growth

Scientists have a new idea for how Earth got its oxygen: It's because the planet slowed down and days got longer. A study published Monday proposes and puts to the test the theory that longer, continuous daylight kick-started weird bacteria into prod...

 

Bug experts seeking new name for destructive gypsy moths

Bug experts are dropping the common name of a destructive insect because it's considered an ethnic slur: the gypsy moth. The Entomological Society of America, which oversees the common names of bugs, is getting rid of the common name of that critter...

 

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