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Articles written by Seth Borenstein

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Winners overlook rigged games' lack of fairness, study finds

WASHINGTON (AP) — When it comes to fairness and privilege, a new study finds it really is not about how you play the game. It's about whether you win or lose. A new experiment, played out as a card game, shows that even when the deck is literally...

 

Best way to fight climate change? Plant a trillion trees

WASHINGTON (AP) — The most effective way to fight global warming is to plant lots of trees, a study says. A trillion of them, maybe more. And there's enough room, Swiss scientists say. Even with existing cities and farmland, there's enough space...

 

Survey sees biggest US honeybee winter die-off yet

WASHINGTON (AP) — Winter hit U.S. honeybees hard with the highest loss rate yet, an annual survey of beekeepers showed. The annual nationwide survey by the Bee Informed Partnership found 37.7% of honeybee colonies died this past winter, nearly 9...

 

Old spy images reveal Himalayan glaciers are melting fast

WASHINGTON (AP) — Cold War era spy satellite images are showing scientists that glaciers on the Himalayas are now melting about twice as fast as they used to. The Asian mountain range, which includes Mount Everest, has been losing ice at a rate of...

 

US air quality is slipping after years of improvement

After decades of improvement, America's air may not be getting any cleaner. Over the last two years the nation had more polluted air days than just a few years earlier, federal data shows. While it remains unclear whether this is the beginning of a...

 

Emails: Trump official pressed NASA on climate science

WASHINGTON (AP) — Once a skeptic about climate change, Jim Bridenstine came around to the prevailing view of scientists before he took over as NASA administrator. That evolution did not sit well with a Trump environmental adviser, nor a think-tank...

 

In hot water? Study says warming may reduce sea life by 17%

WASHINGTON (AP) — The world's oceans will likely lose about one-sixth of their fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path, a new study says. Every degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) tha...

 

AP FACT CHECK: Trump and the credit and blame game

WASHINGTON (AP) — The apportioning of credit and blame went awry in President Donald Trump's remarks over the past week. He hailed pristine air quality that isn't, placed responsibility on Mexico for the entire U.S. drug problem and told Puerto...

 

AP FACT CHECK: Trump didn't set records on clean air in US

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is getting his facts wrong when it comes to clean air in the U.S. In remarks Wednesday with Ireland's Prime Minister Leo Varadkar, he insisted the U.S. has the "cleanest air in the world" and is "setting...

 

Science Says: Why biodiversity matters to you

You may go your entire life without seeing an endangered species, yet the globe's biodiversity crisis threatens all of humanity in numerous unseen or unrecognized ways, scientists say. A massive United Nations report this week warned that nature is...

 

AP FACT CHECK: Unraveling the mystery of whether cows fart

WASHINGTON (AP) — Let's clear the air about cow farts. In the climate change debate, some policymakers seem to be bovine flatulence deniers. This became apparent in the fuss over the Green New Deal put forward by some liberal Democrats. More...

 

New study says universe expanding faster and is younger

WASHINGTON (AP) — The universe is expanding faster than it used to, meaning it's about a billion years younger than we thought, a new study by a Nobel Prize winner says. And that's sending a shudder through the world of physics, making astronomers...

 

Picture was clear, but black hole's name a little fuzzy

WASHINGTON (AP) — The newly pictured supermassive black hole is a beast with no name, at least not an official one. And what happens next could be cosmically confusing. The team of astronomers who created the image of the black hole called it...

 

Science fact: Astronomers reveal first image of a black hole

WASHINGTON (AP) — Humanity got its first glimpse Wednesday of the cosmic place of no return: a black hole. And it's as hot, as violent and as beautiful as science fiction imagined. In a breakthrough that thrilled the world of astrophysics and...

 

Scientists reveal first image ever made of a black hole

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists on Wednesday revealed the first image ever made of a black hole, depicting a fiery orange and black ring of gravity-twisted light swirling around the edges of the abyss. Assembling data gathered by eight radio...

 

Snapshot of extinction: Fossils show day of killer asteroid

WASHINGTON (AP) — New research released Friday captures a fossilized snapshot of the day nearly 66 million years ago when an asteroid smacked Earth, fire rained from the sky and the ground shook far worse than any modern earthquake. It was the day...

 

Unprecedented spring flooding possible, US forecasters say

The stage is set for unprecedented major flooding this spring for most of the nation, U.S. weather officials said Thursday. More than 200 million Americans are at risk for some kind of flooding, with 13 million of them at risk of major inundation,...

 

Science Says: Tiny 'water bears' can teach us about survival

WASHINGTON (AP) — Earth's ultimate survivors can weather extreme heat, cold, radiation and even the vacuum of space. Now the U.S. military hopes these tiny critters called tardigrades can teach us about true toughness. These animals are...

 

AP FACT CHECK: O'Rourke on climate, Trump on 'no collusion'

WASHINGTON (AP) — Beto O'Rourke opened his Democratic presidential campaign this past week with a call to action on global warming that misrepresented the science. From Iowa, he claimed scientists are united in believing the planet only has a...

 

AP Analysis: Hot records falling twice as often as cold ones

Over the past 20 years, Americans have been twice as likely to sweat through record-breaking heat rather than shiver through record-setting cold, a new Associated Press data analysis shows. The AP looked at 424 weather stations throughout the Lower...

 

Climate threat doubter is leading effort to advise Trump

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is exploring the idea of forming a special committee to look at climate change and security risks, with the effort being coordinated by a 79-year-old physicist who rejects mainstream climate science. A...

 

Potential privacy lapse found in Americans' 2010 census data

WASHINGTON (AP) — An internal team at the Census Bureau found that basic personal information collected from more than 100 million Americans during the 2010 head count could be reconstructed from obscured data, but with lots of mistakes, a top...

 

Year in space put US astronaut's disease defenses on alert

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly a year in space put astronaut Scott Kelly's immune system on high alert and changed the activity of some of his genes compared to his Earth-bound identical twin, researchers said Friday. Scientists don't know if the changes...

 

Heading south: Warming to change how US cities feel in 2080

WASHINGTON (AP) — The climate in New York City in 60 years could feel like Arkansas now. Chicago could seem like Kansas City and San Francisco could get a Southern California climate if global warming pollution continues at the current pace, a new...

 

2018 was 4th warmest, but next 5 years could break records

WASHINGTON (AP) — While 2018 was the fourth-warmest year on record, British meteorologists are predicting the next five years will be much hotter, maybe even record-breaking. Two U.S. agencies, the United Kingdom Met Office and the World...

 

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