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Articles written by Seth Borenstein

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Fossils reveal dinosaur forerunner smaller than a cellphone

Meet Kongonaphon kely, a pocket-sized dinosaur forerunner that was smaller than your cellphone. The creature, which predated dinosaurs and flying pterosaurs, was just shy of 4 inches (10 centimeters) tall, according to a study published Monday in...

 

Fish more vulnerable to warming water than first thought

Global warming looks like it will be a bigger problem for the world's fish species than scientists first thought: A new study shows that when fish are spawning or are embryos they are more vulnerable to hotter water. With medium-level human-caused...

 

Not so random acts: Science finds that being kind pays off

Acts of kindness may not be that random after all. Science says being kind pays off. Research shows that acts of kindness make us feel better and healthier. Kindness is also key to how we evolved and survived as a species, scientists say. We are...

 

Temperature spike: Earth ties record high heat May reading

Earth's temperature spiked to tie a record high for May, U.S. meteorologists reported Friday. Last month the global average temperature was 60.3 degrees (15.7 degrees Celsius), tying 2016 for the hottest May in 141 years of record keeping, according...

 

Scientists learn how tiny critters make ocean 'snot palaces'

KENSINGTON, Maryland (AP) — Master builders of the sea construct the equivalent of a complex five-story house that protects them from predators and funnels and filters food for them — all from snot coming out of their heads. And when these...

 

First commercial space taxi a pit stop on Musk's Mars quest

It all started with the dream of growing a rose on Mars. That vision, Elon Musk's vision, morphed into a shake-up of the old space industry, and a fleet of new private rockets. Now, those rockets will launch NASA astronauts from Florida to the Intern...

 

Bug experts dismiss worry about US 'murder hornets' as hype

Insect experts say people should calm down about the big bug with the nickname "murder hornet" — unless you are a beekeeper or a honeybee. The Asian giant hornets found in Washington state that grabbed headlines this week aren't big killers of...

 

Bugged: Earth's insect population shrinks 27% in 30 years

KENSINGTON, Maryland (AP) — The world has lost more than one quarter of its land-dwelling insects in the past 30 years, according to researchers whose big picture study of global bug decline paints a disturbing but more nuanced problem than earlier...

 

One more victory: Biden wins most Super Tuesday delegates

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Vice President Joe Biden has put an exclamation point on his Super Tuesday victories by winning the most delegates on the presidential primary calendar's biggest night. The Associated Press has allocated more than 92% of...

 

Fever chart: Earth had its hottest decade on record in 2010s

WASHINGTON (AP) — The decade that just ended was by far the hottest ever measured on Earth, capped off by the second-warmest year on record, two U.S. agencies reported Wednesday. And scientists said they see no end to the way man-made climate...

 

Q&A: How climate change, other factors stoke Australia fires

Australia's unprecedented wildfires are supercharged thanks to climate change, the type of trees catching fire and weather, experts say. And these fires are so extreme that they are triggering their own thunderstorms. Here are a few questions and...

 

Climate scientists try to cut their own carbon footprints

For years, Kim Cobb was the Indiana Jones of climate science. The Georgia Tech professor flew to the caves of Borneo to study ancient and current climate conditions. She jetted to a remote South Pacific island to see the effects of warming on coral....

 

Global carbon pollution continues to rise, but more slowly

WASHINGTON (AP) — The world continues to increase the amount of heat-trapping carbon dioxide it pumps into the air, but it's not rising as fast as in the previous couple years. Led by big jumps from China and India, the world is projected to spew...

 

Study: Alien grasses are making more frequent US wildfires

WASHINGTON (AP) — For much of the United States, invasive grass species are making wildfires more frequent, especially in fire-prone California, a new study finds. Twelve non-native species act as "little arsonist grasses," said study co-author...

 

Scientists discover big storms can create 'stormquakes'

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have discovered a mash-up of two feared disasters — hurricanes and earthquakes. They're calling them "stormquakes." It's a shaking of the sea floor during a hurricane or nor'easter that rumbles like a magnitude 3.5...

 

With warming, get used to blackouts to prevent wildfires

WASHINGTON (AP) — Expect more preventative power blackouts in California as the climate gets hotter and drier and the wildfire season gets nastier and longer, scientists say. The Golden State already is fire-prone with lots of dry plants and...

 

'A planet full of ifs': Young people express climate angst

NEW YORK (AP) — Around climate-change protests, tears linger. Youthful activists cite all-too depressing science and develop angst. They grieve for a future they worry they'll never have. Many young climate activists say they feel hopeless and...

 

'You are failing us': Plans, frustration at UN climate talks

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Scolded for doing little, leader after leader promised the United Nations on Monday to do more to prevent a warming world from reaching even more dangerous levels. As they made their pledges at the Climate Action Summit, thoug... Full story

 

AP FACT CHECK: Trump and Democrats mangle science

WASHINGTON (AP) — Science took a beating in the political arena this past week as President Donald Trump sowed confusion about Hurricane Dorian's path and Democratic presidential candidates rang false alarms about the air we breathe. Trump found...

 

AP FACT CHECK: Trump's bluster on hurricanes, guns, economy

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing another deadly mass shooting, President Donald Trump is deflecting on gun control. Over the weekend, he pointed to mental illness as a likely culprit behind recent shootings in Odessa, Texas, and elsewhere, even though...

 

Climate change turns Arctic into strategic, economic hotspot

TASIILAQ, Greenland (AP) — From a helicopter, Greenland's brilliant white ice and dark mountains make the desolation seem to go on forever. And the few people who live here — its whole population wouldn't fill a football stadium — are poor, wit...

 

Earth's future is being written in fast-melting Greenland

HELHEIM GLACIER, Greenland (AP) — This is where Earth's refrigerator door is left open, where glaciers dwindle and seas begin to rise. New York University air and ocean scientist David Holland, who is tracking what's happening in Greenland from...

 

Greenland to Trump: Thanks, but we're not for sale

TASIILAQ, Greenland (AP) — Greenlanders are giving Donald Trump the cold shoulder. Although amused, they're definitely not warming up to the U.S. president's talk of buying the semiautonomous Danish territory. "We see it as an expression of...

 

El Nino fades so forecasters expect busier hurricane season

WASHINGTON (AP) — Government meteorologists say this year's hurricane season may be busier than initially expected now that summer's weak El Nino has faded away. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Prediction Center said...

 

UN climate report: Change land use to avoid a hungry future

GENEVA (AP) — Human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading the Earth's land and the way people use the land is making global warming worse, a new United Nations scientific report says. That creates a vicious cycle which is already making...

 

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