Articles from the July 10, 2019 edition


Sorted by date  Results 26 - 50 of 57

Page Up

  • Person of interest sought in deaths of 2 in central Oklahoma

    Jul 10, 2019

    STROUD, Okla. (AP) — Authorities say they are looking for a person of interest in the slayings of two people in central Oklahoma. The Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation says police officers discovered the bodies of 65-year-old Mark Pittman and 63-year-old Pauletta Pittman about 9:30 a.m. Tuesday in their home in Stroud, about 52 miles (84 kilometers) northeast of Oklahoma City. Authorities have not said how they were killed. OSBI investigators say they are looking for a person of interest who was living in the home at the time the couple w...

  • Retired Oklahoma sailor remembers career that spanned 3 wars

    James Neal, Enid News & Eagle|Jul 10, 2019

    HUNTER, Okla. (AP) — Only about 7% of adults in the United States have served in the military, according to a 2017 Pew Research Center study, and only a fraction of those have served in combat. Few Americans, then, can share the experience of Virgil Wayne McCray, 93, of Hunter, whose service in the Navy includes combat in World War II, Korea and Vietnam. McCray's service record reads like a catalog of the Navy's major campaigns of the 20th century, including names like Okinawa, Enewetok, Inchon, the Cuban Missile Crisis and the Tet O...

  • Major League pitcher invites hunters to Oklahoma duck dugout

    Kelly Bostian, Tulsa World|Jul 10, 2019

    TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Archie Bradley is making a call from the bullpen to see if hunters might like to join him in a dugout in Oklahoma. Or more accurately, in a duck blind. The former Broken Arrow baseball and football standout who was drafted by the Diamondbacks in the first round in 2011, developed a love for waterfowl hunting about the same time his baseball career took off. Now he and former BA teammate Mak Monckton and Spring Valley Rod & Gun Club founder Adam Maris have an idea to boost Oklahoma's reputation a...

  • Maker's Church members show love by helping Norman neighbors

    BREANNA MITCHELL, The Norman Transcript|Jul 10, 2019

    NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — Members of the Maker's Church weren't afraid to get their hands dirty when it meant helping their Norman neighbors. About 20 members of the congregation recently gathered at Frances Cate Park at their Love Your Neighbor Day to spruce up the park and the Carter Avenue sidewalk running along it. "The biggest goal is to clean up the area and make it more accessible," Maker's Church co-founder Dottie Moon told The Norman Transcript. "This is our area, this is our neighborhood (and) this is what Maker's is about." Maker's C...

  • Oklahoma City Archdiocese misconduct report delayed again

    David Warren|Jul 10, 2019

    The Archdiocese of Oklahoma City now says there's no timetable for the repeatedly delayed release of a report on priests accused of sexual misconduct with minors. The church "miscalculated" how long reviewing the files of past and current priests would take, archdiocese spokeswoman Diane Clay said Monday. The archdiocese hired the Oklahoma-based law firm of McAfee and Taft to produce the report, including an analysis scrutinizing how the archdiocese responded to past allegations of abuse. "They're really trying to be as thorough and...

  • Oklahoma City dwelling offers cancer patients free lodging

    K.S. MCNUTT, The Oklahoman|Jul 10, 2019

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — When Sabra Huntsberger's daughter, Karli Ewing, was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2002 they lived in Guymon. Treatment meant driving four hours to Oklahoma City, where they often had to stay two weeks at a time. "Luckily, we had family (in the area)," Huntsberger said. While they had a place to stay, many other families traveling long distances for treatment did not. "I met so many other people who would drive for hours to get chemo and then drive home," she told The Oklahoman. Soon, cancer patients who come to O...

  • Leaders want Oklahoma City's new top cop to boost relations

    Jul 10, 2019

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma City's community leaders say they are cautiously optimistic that the city's new police chief will improve relations between the police department and historically underrepresented groups. Wade Gourley, 51, was appointe d Monday as the department's first new chief in 15 years and will oversee more than 1,200 uniformed officers. A 30-year veteran of the force, Gourley replaces former Chief Bill Citty, who retired in May after 41 years with the agency. Kris Steele, executive director of Oklahomans for Criminal J...

  • OKC school board member seeks to stop discussion of conduct

    Jul 10, 2019

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — An Oklahoma City School Board member seeks to permanently prevent the board from discussing his conduct. In a motion dated July 3, member Charles Henry asks a judge for a permanent injunction to stop the board from actions that he says violate his constitutional rights to free speech and due process. The Oklahoman reports Henry obtained a temporary restraining order June 24 after a meeting agenda included a private discussion about possible discipline against Henry but cited no specific violations. Henry voiced several c...

  • Series of small earthquakes shake central Oklahoma

    Jul 10, 2019

    KINGFISHER, Okla. (AP) — No injuries or damage have been reported following several small earthquakes in central Oklahoma. The U.S. Geological Survey says a magnitude 3.1 temblor was recorded at 9:44 a.m. Tuesday 7 miles (12 kilometers) west of Kingfisher, or about 35 miles (58 kilometers) west of Oklahoma City. The earthquake was recorded at a depth of 4 miles (6.3 kilometers). Two other earthquakes, both magnitude 2.6, were recorded in the same area Tuesday. Thousands of earthquakes in Oklahoma in recent years have been linked to the u...

  • Sentencing hearing begins for Oklahoma teen in murder case

    Jul 10, 2019

    TULSA, Okla. (AP) — A sentencing hearing has begun for an Oklahoma teenager who was accused of killing a schoolteacher and raping an 81-year-old woman. A three-day hearing began in Tulsa Tuesday for 18-year-old Deonte Green, who pleaded guilty in March to first-degree murder and 19 other counts in a blind plea, meaning it was entered without a sentencing agreement with prosecutors. Following the sentencing hearing, District Judge Kelly Greenough will have discretion in determining a sentence for Green, who faces up to life in prison without p...

  • Kansas man on horseback finds missing 87-year-old woman

    Jul 10, 2019

    STERLING, Kan. (AP) — A man on horseback has found a missing 87-year-old Kansas woman with Alzheimer's. KWCH-TV reports that 76-year-old Garry Battey was out riding when he found Vonita Renae Colle safe Tuesday about a quarter mile (0.4 kilometer) from her home in Sterling. Colle had been reported missing Monday, leading to a search. Battey says the Lord told him where to go. Colle was taken to a hospital for evaluation, and a statewide Silver Alert for her was canceled. ___ Information from: KWCH-TV, http://www.kwch.com/...

  • Suit: Deputy forced out after reporting sexual assault

    Jul 10, 2019

    LEAVENWORTH, Kan. (AP) — A former Kansas sheriff's deputy alleges in a lawsuit that she was forced out of her job after reporting that a fellow deputy had sexually assaulted her. The suit, filed Monday in federal court, says the Leavenworth County Sheriff's Office fostered a culture of sexual harassment throughout the plaintiff's employment. The Kansas City Star reports it also says that after a two-month suspension, her abuser returned to work with no further disciplinary measures. The sheriff's office declined to comment on the suit b...

  • Kansas junior college president announces plans to retire

    Jul 10, 2019

    OVERLAND PARK, Kan. (AP) — A suburban Kansas City community college's president has announced plans to retire just months after controversy erupted over statements he purportedly made about the affluence of its students. Johnson County Community College said Tuesday that Joe Sopcich plans to step down July 1, 2020. The board renewed his contract last month. A college spokesman noted that Sopcich turns 65 in April 2020. Issues arose in February when a Democratic National Committee member live-tweeted remarks he overheard Sopcich make while d...

  • Popular cafe among casualties of July 4 flooding in Kansas

    Jul 10, 2019

    DURHAM, Kan. (AP) — The owners of a tiny central Kansas cafe whose Mennonite-style cooking had a large following are looking for someone else to reopen the business after it suffered extensive damage in Fourth of July flash flooding. The Wichita Eagle reports that the restaurant, called Main Street Cafe, was among one of many businesses and homes flooded in the Marion County town of Durham after a thunderstorm. Wendell Wedel says the cafe he had run with his wife, Linda, for 24 years was filled with about 32 inches (81.28 centimeters) of w...

  • Wichita opens wetlands park in migratory bird resting spot

    Jul 10, 2019

    WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Wichita has opened a 91-acre (36.8 hectare) wetland park in an area where thousands of migratory birds stop each year. The Wichita Eagle reports that visitors to the Pracht Wetlands Park can walk over galvanized-steel boardwalks and watch birds behind two observation points that are similar to duck blinds. Eventually there will be a half-mile loop of boardwalk circling the northern half of the park with multiple observation points and an observation tower. The total budget for the project is around $7.5 million. The City C...

  • Most attackers made threats before incident, report finds

    Colleen Long|Jul 10, 2019

    WASHINGTON (AP) — One-third of the attackers who terrorized schools, houses of worship or businesses nationwide last year had a history of serious domestic violence, two-thirds had mental health issues, and nearly all had made threatening or concerning communications that worried others before they struck, according to a U.S. Secret Service report on mass attacks. The Secret Service studied 27 incidents where a total of 91 people were killed and 107 more injured in public spaces in 2018. Among them: the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas H...

  • Is teaching writing as important as teaching reading?

    MOLLY SPRAYREGEN|Jul 10, 2019

    When we think of literacy, we tend to think of reading. Schools, literary nonprofits and philanthropists often focus on encouraging students to be strong readers with solid comprehension skills. While those skills are crucial, many experts say critical and creative writing skills are equally important, and are too often overlooked. Compared to reading, writing is more active, encouraging students to be independent thinkers, take ownership over their own stories and ideas, and communicate them clearly to others, says Elyse Eidman-Aadahl,...

  • UN report: Climate change is undermining poverty eradication

    Edith M. Lederer|Jul 10, 2019

    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Hunger is growing and the world is not on track to end extreme poverty by 2030 and meet other U.N. goals, mainly because progress is being undermined by the impact of climate change and increasing inequality, a U.N. report said Tuesday. The report on progress toward achieving the 17 U.N. goals notes achievements in some areas, including a 49% fall in child mortality between 2000 and 2017 as well as electricity now reaching nearly 90% of the world's population. But Liu Zhenmin, the U.N. undersecretary-general for e...

  • A year after dealing with drought, farmers battle wet fields

    ELISA SAND, Aberdeen American News|Jul 10, 2019

    ABERBEEN, S.D. (AP) — While some have told Lannie Mielke that it's better to deal with too much water than not enough, he disagrees. Mielke lives south of Aberdeen between Brentford and Mellette. That farmland is near the James River. It's handling the water well enough. His livestock operation near Conde, however, is another story. "That's the land that's really wet," he said, adding that there's no way to compare the conditions at the two sites. The Conde farm got 7 inches alone in the past week or so, he said, and half of it came from a d...

  • Financier in sex abuse case went from math whiz to titan

    MICHAEL R. SISAK and JIM MUSTIAN|Jul 10, 2019

    NEW YORK (AP) — He has rubbed elbows with a prince and flown a former president on his private jet. He amassed a fortune that includes a 100-acre island in the Caribbean and one of the biggest mansions in New York. He has donated tens of millions of dollars to Harvard and other causes, becoming a darling of professors and scientists — all without a college degree. Jeffrey Epstein has long been an enigma, his ascent shrouded in mystery. Just how a middle-class Brooklyn math whiz became a Wall Street master of high finance with friends in ver...

  • Fresh from the lab: Startups make meat that avoids slaughter

    Terence Chea|Jul 10, 2019

    EMERYVILLE, Calif. (AP) — Uma Valeti slices into a pan-fried chicken cutlet in the kitchen of his startup, Memphis Meats. He sniffs the tender morsel on his fork before taking a bite. He chews slowly, absorbing the taste. "Our chicken is chicken ... you've got to taste it to believe it," Valeti says. This is no ordinary piece of poultry. No chicken was raised or slaughtered to harvest the meat. It was produced in a laboratory by extracting cells from a chicken and feeding them in a nutrient broth until the cell culture grew into raw meat. M...

  • A peek into opioid users' brains as they try to quit

    Lauraan Neergaard|Jul 10, 2019

    BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — Lying inside a scanner, the patient watched as pictures appeared one by one: A bicycle. A cupcake. Heroin. Outside, researchers tracked her brain's reactions to the surprise sight of the drug she'd fought to kick. Government scientists are starting to peek into the brains of people caught in the nation's opioid epidemic, to see if medicines proven to treat addiction, like methadone, do more than ease the cravings and withdrawal. Do they also heal a brain damaged by addiction? And which one works best for which patient? T...

  • University of Nebraska team creates cornfield robot system

    Chris Dunker, Lincoln Journal Star|Jul 10, 2019

    LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — Plant science students at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln are still taught to phenotype by hand, wading into muddy fields to record the differences in physical characteristics between varying corn hybrids with a small set of tools and a pen and notebook. But like the rest of 21st century life, technology is on track to render humans obsolete. A team of UNL plant scientists and biological systems engineers have built an automated system capable of detecting an individual corn leaf and grasping it with robotic precision to...

  • Chicago police investigators confirm alligator in lagoon

    Jul 10, 2019

    CHICAGO (AP) — Chicago police investigators have cracked the case: A 4-5 foot alligator is living in a lagoon at one of the city's most popular parks. Chicago police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi says Tuesday that investigators went to Humboldt Park Lagoon on the city's West Side and confirmed that the unusual resident is there as reported on social media. Officials couldn't say how the creature got there. City officials say alligator traps are being placed around the lagoon in hopes the animal will swim into one and be safely removed. G...

  • Police: Woman throws snake at driver in carjacking

    Jul 10, 2019

    GREENVILLE, S.C. (AP) — Police say a woman stole a vehicle after throwing a snake at the driver, then crashed through barricades set up for a pole-vaulting exhibition in South Carolina. In a statement, Greenville Police identified the suspect as 29-year-old Hilmary Moreno-Berrios. They she was hurt in Friday's crash and released from the hospital Monday. Authorities say Moreno-Berrios demanded a woman's keys and threw a live black snake at her. They say she then drove the stolen SUV with the snake still in it into barriers set up for the L...

Page Down