'Godzilla' shark discovered in New Mexico gets formal name

 

April 16, 2021



SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The 300-million-year-old shark's teeth were the first sign that it might be a distinct species.

The ancient chompers looked less like the spear-like rows of teeth of related species. They were squatter and shorter, less than an inch long, around 2 centimeters.

"Great for grasping and crushing prey rather than piercing prey," said discoverer John-Paul Hodnett, who was a graduate student when he unearthed the first fossils of the shark at a dig east of Albuquerque in 2013.

This week, Hodnett and a slew of other researchers published their findings in a bulletin of the...



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