Regional / Health

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 By JOHN HANNA    Regional    February 28, 2024 

States offer services for disabled kids, then make their families wait 10 years for them

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — When Lilly Miller was in elementary school, teachers told her parents they needed to immediately sign up their youngest daughter, who has Down syndrome, for a wait list so the state would pay for a day program when she grew up....

 

About as many abortions are happening in the US monthly as before Roe was overturned, report finds

The number of abortions performed each month is about the same as before the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and the nationwide right to abortion more than a year and a half ago, a new report finds. The latest edition of the #WeCount...

 

Silent brain changes precede Alzheimer's. Researchers have new clues about which come first

WASHINGTON (AP) — Alzheimer's quietly ravages the brain long before symptoms appear and now scientists have new clues about the dominolike sequence of those changes — a potential window to one day intervene. A large study in China tracked...

 

14 GOP-led states have turned down federal money to feed low-income kids in the summer. Here's why

Lower-income families with school-age kids can get help from the federal government paying for groceries this summer, unless they live in one of the 14 states that have said no to joining the program this year. The reasons for the rejections, all...

 

State governments looking to protect health-related data as it's used in abortion battle

Some state governments and federal regulators were already moving to keep individuals' reproductive health information private when a U.S. senator's report last week offered a new jolt, describing how cellphone location data was used to send...

 

As cancer treatment advances, patients and doctors push back against drugs' harsh side effects

For cancer patients, the harsh side effects of powerful drugs have long been the trade-off for living longer. Now, patients and doctors are questioning whether all that suffering is necessary. They've ignited a movement to radically change how new...

 

Lupus and other autoimmune diseases strike far more women than men. Now there's a clue why

WASHINGTON (AP) — Women are far more likely than men to get autoimmune diseases, when an out-of-whack immune system attacks their own bodies — and new research may finally explain why. It's all about how the body handles females' extra X...

 

The US hasn't seen syphilis numbers this high since 1950. Other STD rates are down or flat

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. syphilis epidemic isn't abating, with the rate of infectious cases rising 9% in 2022, according to a new federal government report on sexually transmitted diseases in adults. But there's some unexpected good news: The rate...

 

Camp Lejeune water contamination tied to a range of cancers, CDC study says

NEW YORK (AP) — Military personnel stationed at Camp Lejeune from 1975 to 1985 had at least a 20% higher risk for a number of cancers than those stationed elsewhere, federal health officials said Wednesday in a long-awaited study about the North...

 

GOP legislatures in some states seek ways to undermine voters' ability to determine abortion rights

CHICAGO (AP) — Legislative efforts in Missouri and Mississippi are attempting to prevent voters from having a say over abortion rights, building on anti-abortion strategies seen in other states, including last year in Ohio. Democrats and abortion r...

 

Anti-abortion activists brace for challenges ahead as they gather for annual March for Life

A year ago, anti-abortion activists from across the U.S. gathered for their annual March for Life with reason to celebrate: It was their first march since the Supreme Court, seven months earlier, had overturned the nationwide right to abortion. At...

 

US government rejects complaint that woman was improperly denied an emergency abortion in Oklahoma

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says an Oklahoma hospital did not violate federal law when doctors told a woman with a nonviable pregnancy to wait in the parking lot until her condition worsened enough to qualify for an abortion...

 

Why 'viability' is dividing the abortion rights movement

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Reproductive rights activists in Missouri agree they want to get a ballot measure before voters this fall to roll back one of the strictest abortion bans in the country and ensure access. The sticking point is how far the...

 

Caring for Caregivers Act takes effect

OKLAHOMA CITY – First-of-its-kind legislation that gives an expansive tax credit to Oklahoma family caregivers took effect Jan. 1. For the 2024 tax year, unpaid family caregivers will be able to claim up to $2,000 or $3,000 in tax credits for...

 

More than 300,000 Oklahomans dis-enrolled from Medicaid as unwinding nears end

OKLAHOMA CITY — The Oklahoma Health Care Authority is nearing the end of a nine-month period in which it removed hundreds of thousands of Oklahomans from Medicaid due to the end of federal pandemic health care protections. The state agency that...

 

Texas woman who sought court permission for abortion leaves state for the procedure, attorneys say

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A pregnant Texas woman who was seeking court permission for an abortion in an unprecedented challenge to one of the most restrictive bans in the U.S. could not wait any longer and went to another state, her attorneys said...

 

Texas judge grants pregnant woman permission to get an abortion despite state's ban

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A Texas judge on Thursday gave a pregnant woman whose fetus has a fatal diagnosis permission to get an abortion in an unprecedented challenge over bans that more than a dozen states have enacted since Roe v. Wade was...

 

Flu is on the rise while RSV infections may be peaking, US health officials say

NEW YORK (AP) — Flu is picking up steam while RSV lung infections that can hit kids and older people hard may be peaking, U.S. health officials said Friday. COVID-19, though, continues to cause the most hospitalizations and deaths among respiratory...

 

Ransomware attack prompts multistate hospital chain to divert some emergency room patients elsewhere

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A ransomware attack has prompted a healthcare chain that operates 30 hospitals in six states to divert patients from at least some of its emergency rooms to other hospitals, while putting certain elective procedures on pause...

 

Kansas to appeal ruling blocking abortion rules, including a medication restriction

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — The Republican attorney general in Kansas is appealing a state judge's ruling that has blocked enforcement of multiple abortion restrictions, including a new limit on medication and an older rule forcing patients to wait 24 hour...

 

The flu is soaring in seven US states and rising in others, health officials say

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. flu season is underway, with at least seven states reporting high levels of illnesses and cases rising in other parts of the country, health officials say. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted new flu data...

 

Kansas can't enforce new law on abortion pills or make patients wait 24 hours, judge rules

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — A Kansas judge on Monday put a new state law on medication abortions on hold and blocked older restrictions that for years have spelled out what providers must tell patients and forced patients to wait 24 hours to end their...

 

People of African ancestry are poorly represented in genetic studies. A new effort would change that

Scientists are setting out to collect genetic material from 500,000 people of African ancestry to create what they believe will be the world's largest database of genomic information from the population. The hope is to build a new "reference genome"...

 

Report redefines overlapping risks of heart and kidney diseases

Citing the vast number of people affected and the serious health consequences, heart health experts are redefining the overlapping effects of obesity, Type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease and rethinking how they predict...

 

US health officials propose using a cheap antibiotic as a 'morning-after pill' against STDs

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. health officials plan to endorse a common antibiotic as a morning-after pill that gay and bisexual men can use to try to avoid some increasingly common sexually transmitted diseases. The proposed CDC guideline was released Mond...

 

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